Utilities offer incentives to reduce energy use in the midst of a heat wave

Utilities offer incentives to reduce energy use in the midst of a heat wave

As the heatwave continues in New Hampshire, concerns about energy costs are growing, especially during peak hours of use. Utility officials said electricity demand peaks from 4 to 7 p.m., when people return home from work and turn on their air conditioners. . They said there are ways to save money and relieve stress on electrical grids while maintaining comfort, and officials said switching the air conditioner or thermostat 7 to 10 degrees for eight hours a day could reduce energy costs by up to 10% per year. Dehumidifiers help keep costs down because the air conditioner doesn’t have to work as hard. Other tips include changing the air conditioner filter, using a ceiling fan, closing the curtains during the day, using a clothesline instead of the dryer and cooking on the grill. “Try not to use the dishwasher tonight if you don’t have to. Wait until late in the evening,” said William Hinkle, of Eversource. “Try not to run your washer or dryer, things like that.” Smart wireless thermostats could also help improve energy use, officials said. Eversource offers a demand response program to residential and commercial price payers, targeting hours of peak demand. “They’ll get a notification on a particularly hot day like today, and if they choose to sign up for the demand response program and cut back or reduce their energy use, we’ll give them an incentive,” Hinkle said. It is highest between mid and late afternoon. “This is when solar energy starts coming off the grid,” said Alec O’Meara, of Unitil. “The sun is low in the sky, but it’s still very hot, so people are still using air conditioners.” Because utilities set prices every six months based on the previous six months, officials said saving energy now could have benefits later. “If we as a region can cut times of peak energy use, it has the potential to reduce energy costs down the road,” O’Meara said. The region relies on fossil fuels for much of its power generation, so lowering demand during peak hours helps reduce emissions, O’Meara said. Greenhouse gases.

As the heat wave continues in New Hampshire, concerns about energy costs are growing, especially during peak hours of use.

Utility officials said electricity demand peaks from 4 to 7 p.m., when people return home from work and turn on their air conditioners. They said there are ways to save money and relieve stress on electrical grids while maintaining comfort.

Officials said turning the air conditioner or thermostat by 7 to 10 degrees for eight hours a day can cut energy costs by up to 10% annually. Dehumidifiers help keep costs down because the air conditioner doesn’t have to work as hard.

Other tips include changing the air conditioner filter, using a ceiling fan, closing the curtains during the day, using a clothesline instead of the dryer and cooking on the grill.

“Try not to use the dishwasher tonight if you don’t have to. Wait until late in the evening,” said William Hinkle, of Eversource. “Try not to turn on the washer or dryer, things like that.”

Officials said smart wireless thermostats could also help improve energy use.

Eversource offers a demand response program to residential and commercial price payers, targeting peak demand hours.

“They will receive a notification on a particularly hot day like today, and if they choose to sign up for the demand response program and cut back or reduce their energy use, we will give them an incentive,” Henkel said.

Energy cost is highest during the afternoon to late afternoon.

“This is when solar energy started going off the grid,” said Alec O’Meara, of Unitel. “The sun is low in the sky, but it’s still really hot, so people are still using their conditioner.”

Since utilities set prices every six months based on the previous six months, officials said saving energy now could have benefits later.

“If we as an area can cut times of peak energy use, it could potentially lower energy costs in the future,” O’Meara said.

Utility officials said the region relies on fossil fuels for much of its power generation, so lowering demand during peak hours helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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